We will understand these parables more fully if we remember that the strict Jews said, not "There will be joy in heaven over one sinner who repents," but, "There will be joy in heaven over one sinner who is obliterated before God." The father must have been waiting and watching for the son to come home, for he saw him a long way off. A Pharisee was forbidden to be the guest of any such man or to have him as his guest. b. The father in his reply mildly reproves him, and tenderly says, This thy brother - Amazing intimation, that the best of men ought to … "What man of you," he said, "who has a hundred sheep, and who hast lost one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the wilderness and go after the one that is lost until he finds it? He was not one of the family at all. To marry a daughter to one of them was like exposing her bound and helpless to a lion. And bring the fattened calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate. “His father said to him, ‘Look, dear son, you have always stayed by me, and everything I have is yours. The prodigal son is believed to be, by many, a Christian who falls away from the truth and then later returns after repentance but this doesn’t seem to fit to whom this was written too or the story itself. Luke 15:11-32 – The Prodigal Son and His Brother Summary Jesus tells a parable about a man with two sons. Holy Bible, New Living Translation copyright 1996, 2004, 2007, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation. The houses were very dark, for they were lit by one little circular window not much more than about eighteen inches across. And kill the calf we have been fattening. The lost sheep, the lost coin. He went and attached himself to a citizen of that country, and he sent him into his fields to feed pigs; and he had a great desire to fill himself with the husks the pigs were eating; and no one gave anything to him. "Now the elder son was in the field. So the son decided to come home and plead to be taken back not as a son but in the lowest rank of slaves, the hired servants, the men who were only day labourers. Go to, To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. << Luke 14 | Luke 15 | Luke 16 >> (Read all of Luke 15 ) Having thus unfolded the difference in character between the two dispensations, and the circumstances of the transition from the one to the other, the Lord turns (chap. But when this son of yours--this fellow who consumed your living with harlots--came, you killed the fatted calf for him.' Once Lincoln was asked how he was going to treat the rebellious southerners when they had finally been defeated and had returned to the Union of the United States. But we had to rejoice and be glad, for your brother was dead and has come back to life again; he was lost and has been found.'". This prodigal son was who I was and who every Christian was before they were saved. a certain man had two sons; by "the certain man" is meant, God the Father: God indeed is not a man, nor is he to be represented by any human image; but inasmuch as man is the image of God, God is sometimes compared to man, and is called a man of war, an husbandman, &c. which no ways contradict his being a spirit; and true it is, that the second person only assumed human nature; and therefore, whenever a divine person is spoken of as man, Christ is commonly intended: but though the Father never appeared in an human form, yet he seems here to be designed; because the character of a Father, and having sons, more properly belong to him; and the reception of sinners, and the forgiveness of them for Christ's sake, agree with him: and besides, Christ is distinguished from the Father in this parable; and he and his blessings of grace, are signified by other things: by the "two sons" are meant, not angels and men, as that angels are the elder, and men the younger son; for though angels are called the sons of God, and may be said to be elder than men, with respect to creation; and good angels may be said to have been ever with God, and always serving him, and never sinned against him; yet they are never called the brethren of men, nor men their brethren; and besides, are never angry at the return and reception of repenting sinners; for this would be to represent them just the reverse of what they are said to be, in the preceding verse: nor are the Jews and Gentiles here intended, which is the more received and general sense of the parable: those who go this way, suppose the Jews to be the elder brother; and indeed they were so, with respect to external privileges; and were with God, being his household and family; all he had were theirs, that was external; and the character of the elder brother throughout the parable, agrees with the far greater part of that nation; and it is certain, that they did resent the calling of the Gentiles: and these suppose the Gentiles to be the younger brother, who indeed were brought into a church state, later than the Jews; and might be said to be afar off in a far country, and to have spent their substance in idolatry and wickedness; to have been in the utmost distress, and in the most deplorable condition: but to this sense it may be objected, that the Gospel was not as yet preached to the Gentiles; nor were they brought to repentance; nor were they openly received into the divine favour; nor as yet had the Jews murmured at, and resented the kindness of God to them: rather standing and fallen professors may be designed: since the former are very apt to carry it toward the latter, in like manner as the elder brother is represented in this parable, as carrying himself towards the younger: but the true sense, and which the context and occasion of the parable at once determine, is, that by the elder son are meant, the Scribes and Pharisees, and self-righteous persons, among the Jews; and by the younger, the publicans and sinners among the same people; as it is easy to observe, the same are meant by the two sons in the parable in Matthew 21:28. It is the wonder of the love of God that he treats us like that. Get updates from Christian Crier delivered straight to your inbox. The father seems to be symbolic of God the Father as we will see more clearly later in this parable. They looked sadistically forward not to the saving but to the destruction of the sinner. About the time his money ran out, a great famine swept over the land, and he began to starve. He never believed that you could glorify God by blackguarding man; he believed that man was never essentially himself until he came home to God.

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